Fire Restrictions

Be aware that Fire Restrictions may change daily. Check with a Ranger if you have any questions on current conditions. Read more about the dangers of wildfires in a story below the list. Visit Find a Park to locate parks with specific activities or facilities. Remember, only you can prevent Wildfires! Visit firerestrictions.us/az/ for information on current restrictions on all public lands.

Slide Fire Current Fire Information

 

Current AZ State Park Fire Restrictions

Alamo Lake SP: Fires are not allowed in the fire pits. Gas/propane stoves may be used for cooking purposes only. No fires along shoreline or wildlife areas. No smoking except in vehicles and designated areas. No fireworks.
Boyce Thompson Arboretum SP: Contact the park.
Buckskin Mountain SP: Fires are not allowed in the fire pits. Gas/propane stoves may be used for cooking purposes only. No smoking while hiking.
Catalina SP: No wood fires allowed. Propane fires allowed in campgrounds.
Cattail Cove SP: In the main campground, fires are not allowed in the fire pits. Gas/propane stoves may be used for cooking purposes only. On the lake sites, gas/propane stoves may be used for cooking purposes only, however no fires are allowed on the lake sites at any time.
Dead Horse Ranch SP: No fires except for devices fueled solely by liquid petroleum or LPG fuels that can be turned on and off. Such devices can only be used in an area that is barren or cleared of all overhead and surrounding flammable materials within three feet of the device. No smoking except within an enclosed vehicle or building.
Fool Hollow Lake RA: No restrictions currently.
Fort Verde SHP: Propane fires allowed in designated grills only.
Homolovi SP: No fires except for gas or propane stoves. No smoking except within an enclosed vehicle or building.
Jerome SHP: Propane fires allowed in designated grills only.
Kartchner Caverns SP: Campfires prohibited except for the use of propane grills/stoves.
Lake Havasu SP: Fires are not allowed in the fire pits. Gas/propane stoves may be used for cooking purposes only. NO smoking while hiking.
Lost Dutchman SP: Fires are allowed in the fire pits. Gas/propane stoves may be used for cooking purposes only. No smoking while hiking.
Lyman Lake SP: Gas/propane stoves may be used for cooking purposes only.
McFarland SHP: Propane fires allowed in designated grills only.
Oracle SP: No smoking except in vehicles. No smoking while hiking.
Patagonia Lake SP: No building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire, charcoal, coal, or wood stove including fires in developed campgrounds or improved sites.
EXCEPTION: Propane and LPG fueled devices that can be turned off and on are allowed in barren areas or areas clear of overhead and surrounding flammable materials. Smoking is prohibited unless it is within an enclosed vehicle or building. No discharging firearms except while engaged in a lawful hunt. No discharging of fireworks.
Picacho Peak SP: Seasonal summer closure from May 23 to September 12, 2014.
Red Rock SP: No smoking except in vehicles. No smoking while hiking.
Riordan Mansion SHP: Propane fires allowed in designated grills only..
River Island SP : Fires are not allowed in the fire pits. Gas/propane stoves may be used for cooking purposes only. No smoking while hiking.
Roper Lake SP: Fires are not allowed in the fire pits. Gas/propane stoves may be used for cooking purposes only. No smoking while hiking.
Slide Rock SP: The Park is open. However, due to the recent fire north of the park, the swim area is still closed. Charcoal fires are permitted in designated grills only. No wood fires allowed in grills. Propane grills and stoves are allowed. Smoking allowed in vehicles only.
Sonoita Creek SNA: No building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire, charcoal, coal, or wood stove including fires in developed campgrounds or improved sites.
EXCEPTION: Propane and LPG fueled devices that can be turned off and on are allowed in barren areas or areas clear of overhead and surrounding flammable materials. Smoking is prohibited unless it is within an enclosed vehicle or building. No discharging firearms except while engaged in a lawful hunt. No discharging of fireworks.
Tombstone Courthouse SHP: Propane fires allowed in designated grills only.
Tonto Natural Bridge SP: No fires except for devices fueled solely by liquid petroleum or LPG fuels that can be turned on and off. Such devices can only be used in an area that is barren or cleared of all overhead and surrounding flammable materials within three feet of the device. No smoking except within an enclosed vehicle or building.
Tubac Presidio SHP: Propane fires allowed in designated grills only.
Verde River Greenway SNA: No fires except for devices fueled solely by liquid petroleum or LPG fuels that can be turned on and off. Such devices can only be used in an area that is barren or cleared of all overhead and surrounding flammable materials within three feet of the device. No smoking except within an enclosed vehicle or building.
Yuma Quartermaster Depot SHP: Propane fires allowed in designated grills only.
Yuma Territorial Prison SHP: Propane fires allowed in designated grills only.

How to Extinguish a Campfire

1. Keep a shovel & water near the fire.   2. Drown the fire with 5 gallons of water.   3. Stir the coals to wet any embers.   4. Feel to make sure coals are Dead Out.

For Arizona Fire Restrictions on Federal & State Lands, Visit the Arizona Interagency Wildfire Prevention Site External Link

Campfires Can Cause Wildfires


Near Slide Rock State Park in Sedona, the Brins Fire burnt 4,300 acres during the summer of 2006. This photo is of the cliffs above the Slide Rock parking lot.

In 2002, devastatingly hot fires burned approximately 600,000 acres of Arizona's timber, most of which were human-caused wildfires quickly extinguished by the wildland firefighters. In 2003, there were 725 human-caused wildfires but most were extinguished before they spread through Arizona's communities. The sad part is that escaped campfires and discarded cigarettes were usually what started these wildfires. For this summer the state is looking at another dry fire season. Campers, hikers, and all outdoor enthusiasts should be cautious when they start campfires anywhere in the southwest. Arizona's communities are at risk because campers must relearn how to properly manage and extinguish a campfire.

Most wildfires in the Southwest get started when a campfire escapes over the top of the rock rim or fire-ring into pine needles or under the soil along dry roots. Campers leave for hiking or fall asleep and don't drown fires. They erroneously believe there is no danger because there may not be wind at that time. Unfortunately, it takes only a small gust of wind to send embers flying around the forest or desert.

A campfire provides light and warmth and represents the tie that binds people together in the wilderness. The fire keeps us warm, cooks our food, dries our socks, and provides glowing warmth for storytelling. But consider the severe drought in the southwest. During the summer season, campers in Arizona should use only propane stoves. Developed campsites may not even be safe when the wind comes up blowing coals across the forest or desert. If a storm is brewing, quickly put your fire out.

Tips for Campfires in Designated Sites

  • Dead pine needles and loamy wood soil will carry fires underground and they can later can pop up somewhere else; this is why water is so critical.
  • Brush needles or debris back at least 10 feet.
  • Move dead branches away from your fire.
  • Start your fire with dry twigs and add a couple of larger dry pieces no bigger than your wrist.
  • Keep the fire low in the ground down under the lip of the fire ring, out of the wind.
  • Keep five gallons of water and a shovel ready at all times in case of an emergency.
  • If embers are flying, your fire is too big! Wet it to get it under control.
  • Never burn very large or fat logs.
  • Don't start a fire when it's windy.
  • Never leave a fire unattended: this includes going to get more wood, going hiking or hunting, or when you go to sleep. 

Don't just cover coals with dirt … that is a dangerous practice! And please never leave your campsite until the coals are cold on the bottom of the fire pit or you may be in for a surprise when you get home to answer a call about a wildfire that started near your campsite. Southwestern states are dry and dangerously susceptible to wildfires, especially during drought. Remember, only you can prevent Wildfires!

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