State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) Home

Recipients of the 2014 Awards in Public Archaeology Announced

Recipients were honored at the 13th Annual Arizona Statewide Historic Preservation Partnership Conference held in Nogales, June 2014. See 2014 Awards in Public Archaeology Recipient List.

Annual Report on State Agency Compliance

The annual report on State Agency compliance with the State Historic Preservation Act for Fiscal Year 2012-2013 is now available for downloading. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Ann Howard, Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer for Archaeology at avh2@azstateparks.gov or (602) 542-7138. SHPO FY 2012-13 Report on State Agency Compliance (PDF Document 431 KB PDF)

Arizona Historic Preservation Conference

The annual Arizona Historic Preservation Conference (conference) is presented by Arizona State Historic Preservation Office, in partnership with the preservation community, including for-profit, non-profit, governmental, tribal and educational institutions. The goal of the Conference is to bring together preservationists from around the state to exchange ideas and success stories, to share perspectives and solutions to preservation issues, to foster cooperation between the diverse Arizona preservation communities, and to offer specialized training to today’s practitioners, while developing tomorrow’s preservationists. For more information visit official Conference website at AZPreservation.com

Places to Remember: Guidance for Inventorying and Maintaining Historic Cemeteries

Site StewardsTo help commemorate Arizona’s centennial on February 14, 2012, a centennial project was begun to inventory and promote the protection of historic cemeteries throughout the state. Historic cemeteries were chosen as the focus of a centennial project because they are important irreplaceable resources many of which are in danger of being lost through neglect, natural erosion, and vandalism. As the Arizona Centennial approached, it seemed appropriate that an organized statewide effort be undertaken to locate, inventory and provide guidance for the conservation and maintenance of these significant properties.

2012 Guidance for Inventorying and Maintaining Historic Cemeteries (PDF Document 8.4 MB PDF)

100 Arizona Archaeological and Historical Sites Open to the Public

In honor of Arizona's Centennial, the Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission assembled the following list of 100 archaeological and historical sites that are open to the public. We encourage you to visit Arizona's past! Download Archaeological and Historical Sites List (PDF) (PDF Document 86 KB PDF) or (XLS) (Excel Document 61 KB XLS)

Watch Site Steward Video Message From Harrison Ford

And learn more about the AZ Site Stewards program Next Section
 

The Arizona State Historic Preservation Office: SHPO, a division of Arizona State Parks, assists private citizens, private institutions, local governments, tribes, and state and federal agencies in the identification, evaluation, protection, and enhancement of historic and archaeological properties that have significance for local communities, the State of Arizona, or the Nation. The role and function of the SHPO is defined in both state law (Arizona Historic Preservation Act) and federal law (National Historic Preservation Act, as amended). Activities of the SHPO include:

  • Statewide survey to identify and evaluate historic structures and archaeological sites;
  • Nomination of eligible historic and archaeological properties to the National Register of Historic Places;
  • Review of federal and state actions that may affect historic and archaeological properties;
  • Technical assistance to owners of historic properties;
  • Technical assistance to Certified Local Governments/local preservation commissions;
  • Public education and awareness programs;
  • Assistance through matching grants; and assistance to property owners seeking tax credits and incentives.

Explore Historic Preservation

Inventory of Arizona Historic Cemeteries

Centennial Milestone: Help preserve history by helping with the Inventory of Arizona Historic Cemeteries (IAHC). Learn More

 

Site Stewards Discovery

Site Stewards discover rare, completely intact pots. Learn More

 

Historic Preservation Plan

New update of Historic Preservation Plan describes principles that guide the activities of the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). Learn More

National Register of Historic Places

The National Register of Historic Places is the Nation's official listing of prehistoric and historic properties worthy of preservation. Learn More

Site Stewards

Do you have an interest in archaeology? Would you like to help preserve archaeological sites around the State? Learn More

Arizona's Cultural History

Read an article that introduces some of the events and people that shaped Arizona's past. Learn More


SHPO Main Pages

Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission
Awards in Public Archaeology presented by GAAC
Local Government Assistance
Public Preservation Programs
National Register of Historic Places
Survey and Planning
Tax Incentives and Grant Programs
State Historic Property Tax Reclassification (SPT) for Owner-Occupied Homes
Review and Compliance
Arizona Site Stewards Program
Historic Sites Review Committee
Archaeological Site Etiquette
Inventory of Arizona Historic Cemeteries (IAHC)
Publications
Links to Related Sites
Introduction to Arizona's Cultural History
SHPO Staff

What is Historic Preservation?

Riordan MansionHistoric preservation is the identification, management, and protection of tangible elements from the past for future generations. It is the history that we can see and experience. As we move into the future with the explosion of new technologies, historic preservation provides an anchor to our past. Historic preservation encourages the protection of historic and archaeological resources that are associated with important past events, themes, and people; that are representative of periods and types of architecture, possess high artistic value; or that are likely to yield valuable information about the past. Historic preservation helps us to know who we are by teaching us about where we came from.

How Does Historic Preservation Benefit Arizona?

  • Arizona's historic and archaeological properties are tangible reminders of the people and events that molded our state.
  • Arizona's archaeological sites hold the clues to 12,000 years of culture, land use, settlement, and exploration.
  • Historic buildings provide character and a sense of continuity for our communities.
  • Arizona's unique historic and archeological resources attract tourists from all over the world.
  • Reuse of existing historic residences and commercial properties conserves energy and materials and is less expensive than building new structures.
  • Historic preservation helps to revitalize inner-city neighborhoods and business districts.

How Can You Become Involved in Historic Preservation?

  • Learn more about the history of your community and Arizona.
  • Join a local preservation, historical, or archaeological organization.
  • Become a Arizona Site Steward Volunteer.
  • Encourage heritage education programs in your schools.
  • Support businesses in your historic downtown districts.
  • Visit local and state historic and archaeological parks and sites.
  • Become involved in local and state decisions, ordinances, and legislation that affect historic and archaeological resources.
  • Explore more on our Related Links page

 
Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission Awards in Public Archaeology

The Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission (Commission) sponsors annual "Awards in Public Archaeology." The Commission is a statutory board that advises the State Historic Preservation Officer on issues of relevance to Arizona archaeology. The Awards are presented to individuals, organizations, and/or programs that have significantly contributed to the protection and preservation of, and education about, Arizona's non-renewable archaeological resources.

These awards can include the following categories of individuals or organizations that are worthy of recognition for their public service/education endeavors: 1) professional archaeologists, 2) avocational archaeologists, 3) Site Stewards, 4) Tribes, 5) private, non-profit entities, 6) government agencies, and 7) private or industrial development entities. In addition, the Commission would like to make an award to an individual for special or lifetime achievement.

See 2013 Winners (2008)    See List of Winners since 1988 (Winners)
Download Award Criteria and Nomination Form (PDF Document 86 KB PDF)

Application to SPT Program

Application and Instructions (PDF Document 176 KB Interactive Enabled PDF)
Learn more

Contact SHPO

The SHPO staff represents various areas of expertise, including prehistoric and historic archaeology, historical architecture, history, architectural history, and grants management. Comments or questions please contact:

SHPO Administrative Assistant
Arizona State Parks
1300 W. Washington Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007

(602) 542-4009 or see SHPO Staff directory

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The activity that is the subject of this website has been financed in part with Federal funds from the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. However, the contents and opinions do not reflect the views or policies of the Department of the Interior, nor does the mention of trade names or commercial products constitute endorsement or recommendation by the Department of the Interior.

This program receives Federal financial assistance for identification and protection of historic properties. Under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the U.S. Department of the Interior prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, or handicap in its federally assisted programs. If you believe you have been discriminated against in any program, activity, or facility as described above, or if you desire further information, please write to: Office of Equal Opportunity, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 20240.